Versta Research Post

Fifteen Basics of “Brand Smart” Research

This past week the American Marketing Association in Chicago held its 2011 annual BrandSmart conference, bringing together top-level marketers from companies such as Groupon, Motorola, Allscripts, Cars.com, Deloitte, Coldwell Banker, Accenture, Hospira, Walgreens, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Grainger, Morningstar, and many others, all of whom shared the newest strategies and case studies for brand building…

Versta Research Post

Entrepreneurial Advice: Rethink Your Research

Executives who lead entrepreneurial firms have dramatically different attitudes about market research from their counterparts at larger established firms, according to a recent study from Saras Sarasvathy, an associate professor of business administration at the University of Virginia. The study suggests that entrepreneurs are more focused on immediate and practical questions that will help them…

Versta Research Post

The Myth of Too Many Choices

Ever since the well-publicized “jam” experiments published ten years ago, product managers have been cautious about assuming that more choices generate higher sales.  The investigators of the research found that more consumers purchased a jar of jam if the sampling table offered six varieties instead of 24.  And there has been a healthy literature and…

The Role of Social Media in Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty Research

Listening to Your Customers through Social Media

In July, I moderated a panel of thought leaders in market research to ponder the question: “How Will Social Media Change Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty (CS&L) Research?” The event was sponsored by the American Marketing Association, and included participants from GfK, Maritz, MARC, SAS, Market Tools, and Versta Research. A partial transcript of our panel’s…

Versta Research Post

Sampling for Concept Testing and Innovation

Many assume that rigorous market research always works with random samples or probability samples.  This assumption is not true.  There are many studies that require purposive sampling instead.  Purposive sampling involves finding people with specific characteristics or qualities, even if they do not fully represent the whole population, because these specific people can provide unique…